Find your zone and overlays

Land in Victoria is divided into zones and overlays. They determine what land can be used for and if a planning permit is needed for building works.

How to use the map:

  1. Enter the property's address in the search field
  2. The Planning Information side window displays a code for each zone, overlay, and schedule affecting the property
  3. Select each code's link to learn your planning requirements and find out if you need a permit.

Please be patient while the map loads.

About zones and overlays

All land in Victoria is divided into areas called zones.

Land is zoned for particular uses, such as residential, industrial, business, or other. Zones determine what land can and can’t be used for, and if a planning permit is needed to carry out works.

A zone sets out land use controls in three sections:

  • Section 1: No permit is required.
  • Section 2: A planning permit is required and will usually be issued with conditions.
  • Section 3: Prohibited uses. Some uses are not allowed on land because they may conflict with other uses. For example, industry is prohibited in the Residential Zone.

While zones are the primary method of organising land in Victoria, the secondary method is called overlays.

Overlays only covers certain areas. They’re used when land has a special feature such as a heritage building or flood risk. Some land may be affected by more than one overlay.

Overlays apply special controls over land, such as to protect heritage under a Heritage Overlay or manage flood areas through the Special Building Overlay.

Schedules modify zones and overlays.

Local councils use them to include local needs, circumstances, and requirements such as:

  • identifying individual properties or areas
  • modifying standards
  • permit exemptions.
 

Overlay summaries

Learn the purpose of each overlay in Stonnington City.

Environment and landscape overlays

Significant Landscape Overlay (SLO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as SLO with a number.

This overlay aims to identify, conserve, and enhance the character of significant landscapes.

 

Heritage and built form overlays

Heritage Overlay (HO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as HO with a number.

This overlays conserves and enhances heritage places of natural or cultural significance. Learn more about Heritage Overlay and design guidelines.

Design And Development Overlay (DDO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as DDO with a number.

The DDO identifies areas with specific design requirements such as building height, building volume, setbacks, or landscaping.

Incorporated Plan Overlay (IPO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as IPO with a number.

An IPO guides the future use and development of land. Before a planning permit can be granted, proposed development or land use may need to be shown on a plan which is incorporated into the planning scheme.

Development Plan Overlay (DPO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as DPO with a number.

This overlay identifies areas where a development contributions plan must be prepared before development can start. Development contributions are payments, services or infrastructure provided by developers to meet the future needs of the community.

Neighbourhood Character Overlay (NCO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as NCO with a number.

This overlay ensures developments respect the neighbourhood character. It aims to prevent, where necessary, the removal of trees and buildings before the neighbourhood character features of the site and the new development have been evaluated.

 

Land management overlays

Land Subject To Inundation Overlay (LSIO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as LSIO with a number.

The LSIO identifies flood-prone land in coastal or riverine areas. It ensures developments maintain free flow of floodwaters, minimise flood damage, and protect waterway health.

Special Building Overlay (SBO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as SBO with a number.

The Special Building Overlay (SBO) identifies land that may be at risk of flooding in a high intensity storm.

The SBO ensures development doesn’t obscure the passage of flood waters or become liable to flooding.

A property may be partially or wholly impacted by the SBO.

Seek advice from the relevant water authority before applying

The SBO is divided into two parts, SBO1 and SBO2, which identify whether the land is in the Melbourne Water drainage system or the Stonnington City Council drainage system.

We recommend seeking advice from the relevant water authority before applying for a planning permit.

SBO1

Melbourne Water

SBO2

City of Stonnington Infrastructure Department

 

Other overlays

Public Acquisition Overlay (PAO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as PAO with a number.

A public acquisition overlay (PAO) is the way land is reserved for a public purpose. It indicates that this land could be compulsorily acquired in the future.

Environmental Audit Overlay (EAO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as EAO.

This overlay applies to potentially contaminated land, such as land previously used for industry or storing chemicals or wastes. Before the land can be used for certain activities such as housing or schools, developers must further investigate to make sure it is suitable.

Development Contributions Plan Overlay (DCPO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as DCPO with a number.

This overlay identifies areas where a development contributions plan must be prepared before development can start. Development contributions are payments, services or infrastructure provided by developers to meet the future needs of the community.

Specific Controls Overlay (SCO)

Shown on the planning scheme map as SCO with a number.

This overlay applies specific controls for land use and development in extraordinary circumstances.

Contact us

To find out if you need a planning permit, contact the planning department on 03 8290 3329.

Related information

Do I need a planning permit?

Applying for a planning permit

Heritage Overlay and design guidelines

How we assess planning applications